About Photographer:

I have had a long career as a public artist making text and image pieces that are often set in a series in the paving of urban areas. They are meant to create a sense of place by referencing the cultures and alternative histories of different peoples and locales. While installing several hundred of these public commissions over many years, I have witnessed and documented the proliferation of the use of large scale photographs as advertisements. New technologies have facilitated the printing of huge images on vinyl, which are then stretched across the face of buildings. These outdoor ads have now come to dominate the visual landscape of the downtown areas of many cities. Over time I have observed that when advertising imprints itself on cities, not surprisingly cities often talk back. It is this dialog that I have been documenting in cities around the country and around the world for the past 20 years. My photographs (which are documentary, not digital manipulations) illustrate the accidental, premeditated, random, and fleeting ways that a city’s inhabitants – from installers and city workers, to protestors and graffiti artists - often respond to commercial messaging. Once an image is released from the safeguards of the corporate photography studio into the unpredictable, capricious topography of the city, the inherent tensions between commercial mythology and urban reality begin to surface. My interest lies in documenting the many ways in which the city can sabotage corporate ads. By capturing these collected alterations, my pictures read like a visual call and response between commercial parables and the actual lives unfolding around them and as an expose of corporate advertising’s infiltration of private life and thought. (Parts of this statement were excerpted from an article about my work by Mija Riedel in TAKE on Art Magazine, New Delhi.)

Entry description: My photographs (which are documentary, not digital manipulations) illustrate the accidental, premeditated, random, and fleeting ways that a city’s inhabitants – from installers and city workers, to protestors and graffiti artists - often respond to commercial messaging. Once an image is released from the safeguards of the corporate photography studio into the unpredictable, capricious topography of the city, the inherent tensions between commercial mythology and urban reality begin to surface. My interest lies in documenting the many ways in which the city can sabotage corporate ads. By capturing these collected alterations, my pictures read like a visual call and response between commercial parables and the actual lives unfolding around them and as an expose of corporate advertising’s infiltration of private life and thought.

(Parts of this statement were excerpted from an article about my work by Mija Riedel in TAKE on Art Magazine, New Delhi.)