Home to Coal

Photographersarah Hoskins
PrizeHonorable Mention
City/Countrylibertyville, United States
Photo Date2016
Technical Infodigital
Story

Home To Coal Coal Mining might have died, but not pride of place. “I worked as a mine inspector for 28 years and only two people died in the mines.” 2016 saw numerous articles and images on Eastern Kentucky, its people and coal, few containing African Americans. I was invited to Lynch, Kentucky in September 2016 for a special weekend celebrating the Pastor’s church Anniversary these are a few from images from that visit, which won’t be my last. Lynch was founded in 1917 by the U.S. Coal and Steel company. The company bought 19,000 acres for the town and built everything from houses and stores to a hospital and baseball field. At its peak, Lynch had about 10,000 residents, but is now down to below 1,000 today. That doesn’t mean it’s not home to those who still reside there.

Entry Description

These images are from Lynch, Kentucky in Harlan County. Eastern Kentucky has been in the news more lately, especially these days as Donald Trump bangs his drum about bringing coal back to the region. I didn’t find any working mines prior to Trumps election, nor have any reopened since. What I did find was a small proud community, and an old mine that gives tours. I hope these images might give the viewer a glimpse into a place that has been in the news an awful lot lately, but the light not often shining on them.

Story

Home To Coal Coal Mining might have died, but not pride of place. “I worked as a mine inspector for 28 years and only two people died in the mines.” 2016 saw numerous articles and images on Eastern Kentucky, its people and coal, few containing African Americans. I was invited to Lynch, Kentucky in September 2016 for a special weekend celebrating the Pastor’s church Anniversary these are a few from images from that visit, which won’t be my last. Lynch was founded in 1917 by the U.S. Coal and Steel company. The company bought 19,000 acres for the town and built everything from houses and stores to a hospital and baseball field. At its peak, Lynch had about 10,000 residents, but is now down to below 1,000 today. That doesn’t mean it’s not home to those who still reside there.

About Photographer

Sarah Hoskins is a Midwest based documentary photographer, currently her time is split between Chicago, Illinois and Lexington, Kentucky. Her work was part of Into Action?s groundbreaking social justice festival of art and ideas held in Los Angeles January 2018. Her photographs have been exhibited nationally and internationally and are in numerous permanent and private collections. Including The Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University, which recently acquired 250 silver gelatin prints and Shepard Fairey?s personal collection. Hoskins is the recipient of numerous grants and fellowships