The Homeplace

PhotographerSarah Hoskins
PrizeHonorable Mention
City/Countrylibertyville, United States
Photo Date2000-2017
Technical Infogelatin silver print
Story

In the decade after the Civil War African American settlements sprang up around the horse farms in Kentucky’s six-county Inner Bluegrass Region. These villages, or hamlets, as they have come to be known were originally inhabited by freed slaves who were needed to work on the area farms. Today, many of the residents are descendents of the freed men and women who founded them. In some cases as many as six generations of a family have lived in succession on a “homeplace” in these communities. Some of these hamlets are prospering while the existence of others is tenuous. With each visit I make I am continually told of people and places where “you need to go. “ 

Entry Description

The Homeplace: Photographs From Historic African American Hamlets In Kentucky Inner Bluegrass Region

Story

In the decade after the Civil War African American settlements sprang up around the horse farms in Kentucky’s six-county Inner Bluegrass Region. These villages, or hamlets, as they have come to be known were originally inhabited by freed slaves who were needed to work on the area farms. Today, many of the residents are descendents of the freed men and women who founded them. In some cases as many as six generations of a family have lived in succession on a “homeplace” in these communities. Some of these hamlets are prospering while the existence of others is tenuous. With each visit I make I am continually told of people and places where “you need to go. “ 

About Photographer

Sarah Hoskins is a Midwest based documentary photographer, currently her time is split between Chicago, Illinois and Lexington, Kentucky. Her work was part of Into Action?s groundbreaking social justice festival of art and ideas held in Los Angeles January 2018. Her photographs have been exhibited nationally and internationally and are in numerous permanent and private collections. Including The Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University, which recently acquired 250 silver gelatin prints and Shepard Fairey?s personal collection. Hoskins is the recipient of numerous grants and fellowships