Greenlandic Sled Dogs, rainstorm

PhotographerJason van Bruggen
PrizeHonorable Mention
Entry Description

As the climate warms and winter gets shorter in the polar regions, many of the human residents are forced to quickly adapt. In Greenland, hunting and travelling by dog sled has been a way of life for many generations. With the winters getting shorted and sea ice less and less stable every year, Greenlanders are being forced to kill more and more of their prized dogs. The price of feeding these packs of working dogs is considerable. The opportunity to offset those costs with a successful hunt and the food provided are diminishing rapidly year to year. This image of dogs standing in a Fall rain storm on an unseasonably warm day represented that shift to me.

About Photographer

Jason van Bruggen is a self-taught photographer and film-maker based in Canada. His work is focussed on depicting North American wilderness, including the Far North in a manner that is simultaneously authentic and narrative -- building new interpretations of these landscapes that have traditionally been the territory of clich├ęd notions of exploration and adventure. Favouring travel that brings him in direct contact with the frontier and those who inhabit it, Jason's immersive work seeks to explore these emerging landscapes that are now becoming the interest of foreign value, political maneuvering and business interests. His images capture the vulnerability of the ecosystems and the people who live within them, illuminating a tension between the strength and fragility of the region; the age old resolve to survive and the current intention to thrive in places where scarcity fosters incredible ingenuity, resilience and hospitality. Currently, his time is balanced between commercial film projects, advocacy and awareness campaigns and fine art projects. His work been featured and awarded in PDN, Applied Arts, Communication Arts and various shows around the world. Jason possesses a Masters Degree in History from Queen's University and is a Fellow International of the Explorers Club. He has travelled and worked in over 100 countries, including some of the most remote and austere locations on the planet. He holds valid EU and Canadian passports.