Rohingya Refugee in Bangladesh

PhotographerK M Asad
PrizeHonorable Mention
Entry Description

"The military killed my husband and torched our home. I fled in a jungle along with my two children. After trying three days I don't want to remember how was I cross the river border and come in this camp” Sitara Begum (21) at Taknaf camp in Bangladesh. UN said up to 30 thousand people have been displaced in clashes with the military in latest violence in Myanmar.

Story

"The military killed my husband and torched our home. I fled in a jungle along with my two children. After trying three days I don't want to remember how was I cross the river border and come in this camp” said Sitara Begum (21) at Taknaf Rohingya refugee camp 27 November 2016 in Bangladesh. According to media reports, the UN said up to 30 thousand people have been displaced clashes with the military in the latest violence in Myanmar. Teknaf, the gateway to Cox's Bazar, a poor but densely populated coastal area, already home to more than 230 000 Rohingya refugees. Myanmar soldiers have poured into the area along Myanmar's frontier with Bangladesh, responding to coordinated attacks on three border posts on October 9 that killed nine police officers. They have locked down the district, where the vast majority of residents are Rohingya. Bangladesh prevented hundreds more from crossing into the country after up to 30,000 Rohingya were displaced by violence in Myanmar’s Rakhine state. Thousands of desperate Rohingya from Myanmar's western Rakhine state have flooded over the border into Bangladesh, bringing with them horrifying claims of gang rape, torture and murder at the hands of Myanmar's security forces. Also the bloodshed is the most serious since hundreds were killed in communal clashes in the western Myanmar state of Rakhine in 2012. It seems both the countries of Naf River have refused to take these unfortunate human beings. This kind of refusal tears their hopes and needs in thousand parts. Though both the countries are trying to save their own security what will be the solution for these unwanted people? They are passing their days in uncertainty. They might be cursing themselves to be a human being with whom everyone is behaving inhumanly. Nur Begum (22) describes how Myanmar army attack that killed her husband and two other children, forced her to flee Rakhine State for Bangladesh with tiny Jamal. After a three-week trip with little food, Begum and her increasingly sick child made it to the camp in Leda, across the Bangladeshi border; but Jamal Hossain’s journey was already at an end.

About Photographer

K. M. Asad (b.1983) is a documentary photographer based in Dhaka, Bangladesh. After completing his basic course on photography in 2005, he joined Pathshala South Asian Media Academy. In 2008-09, he completed his graduation in photography from Pathshala. By observing various social issues, Asad tried to capture those issues and created photo stories including “Bedtime ends on streets” - the street life in Dhaka city, “ Work to Survive” – child labour in Bangladesh, “Live with unexpected reality” – Honey hunting stories near the Sundarban, “Sweeper colony a taboo”- low class people in Bangladesh etc. He has achieved several awards. Among them- Snowden Photography Competition 2011 -"Celebrating the Mining Industry" The People and Culture category Winner (UK), Labour Start picture of the Year 2009 1st place (UK), The Worldwide photography Gala Awards 2011 Portraits & People Contest Honorable Mentions (UK) are some. His work has been published in several national and international books. Some of his photos has been exhibited on “Young portfolio 2009, 1010, 2011(YP)” at the kiyosato museum of photographic Arts (Kmopa) in JAPAN, “Art and witness book 2009” in India, “Centre for Poverty Analysis (CEPA) 2011”—Sri Lanka, “The Manuel Rivera-Ortiz Foundation for International Photography, KAUNAS PHOTO STAR competition—2010(Lithuania)”. Recently, In 2012 he has also been nominated for “The Prix Pictet Commission award”. He attended several international workshops which have been taken by reputed lecturers including Shahidul Alam, David Burnett (contract press images), Frank funier (contract press images), Pedro Meyer, Morten krogvold (Norway), Alison Morley (Times magazine), Raghu Rai (Magnum Photo) and Abir Abdullah (Bangladesh).